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11 09, 2017

Scenario Analysis is Easy with Enrich Analytics

By | 2017-09-11T09:09:28+00:00 September 11th, 2017|Blog|0 Comments

In our latest video, we showcase how easy it is to compare projects and portfolios with Enrich Viewport and the Enrich Analytics Platform. The video covers:

  1. When scenario analysis should be used
  2. How to compare projects head-to-head
  3. How to compare portfolios head-to-head
  4. Using a waterfall diagram to summarize differences between two portfolios
  5. Tricks for selecting and deselecting subsets of a portfolio

Even longtime users of Enrich Analytics will benefit from the tips outlined in the video. We look forward to your comments!

PS: Looking for more on scenario analysis? Check out these related blog posts:

7 09, 2017

Upcoming Conferences: Fall 2017 through early 2018

By | 2017-09-07T16:45:01+00:00 September 7th, 2017|Blog|0 Comments

Enrich will be attending multiple conferences on the East Coast of the US and in Europe in the coming months. Can you join us at any of the following venues?

12-13 September, 2017 – The Pharma CI Conference and Exhibition, Parsippany, New Jersey. We’ll be attending this conference as a partner of Ozmosi, and demonstrating some of the latest competitive intelligence offerings we’ve developed jointly with Ozmosi. Beau Bush of Ozmosi will also be presenting on trends in the clinical trials landscape worldwide.

6-8 November, 2017 – CHI’s Strategic Resource and Portfolio Management Conference, Philadelphia. We are sponsoring this conference and will be discussing challenges in portfolio management scenario and capacity planning during the lunch talk on Tuesday the 7th. This three-day event is actually two conferences in one, with the resource management topics kicking things off and portfolio management for the second half.

8-9 February, 2018 – EBCG’s Healthcare PPM Toolbox, Jersey City, New Jersey. This EBCG conference is a great opportunity to hear about medical devices and diagnostics portfolios as well as large and small molecule drug development. We’ll be speaking at this conference as a gold sponsor.

7-9 March, 2018 – EBCG’s Pharma PPM Toolbox, Dublin, Ireland. We return to this event year after year for the networking and in-depth treatment of drug development portfolios.

Know a conference audience that would benefit from our experience? Thinking about attending a conference or want advice on where your case study would fit best as a presentation? Drop us a line!

10 07, 2017

Identifying Gaps Between Strategy and Funding: An Innovation Portfolio Case Study

By | 2017-07-10T10:38:27+00:00 July 10th, 2017|Blog|0 Comments

A CEO for a large, established, infrastructure company announces a new “strategy,” called Win 21. Under this strategy, the CEO says, revenue in 2021 will be double what it is today, even though growth rates in the last five years have averaged just 2%. To support this goal, the CEO defines three priorities:

  1. Defend the market position of established offerings.
  2. Prepare for new contracts currently being negotiated by ensuring critical service capabilities and technology platforms are in place.
  3. Grow in new markets with new and updated offerings.

Clearly, the strategy represents a challenge for every part of the company—especially the innovation team, which will have to create the new offerings that will drive this growth while supporting established and emerging capabilities.

We worked with the product innovation team at this company to interpret the CEO’s challenge and map a path to meet his audacious goal. The first step—a portfolio diagnostic exercise, was used to assess the potential of the current portfolio in light of the new strategy. The key question: Are the level and distribution of current innovation spending sufficient to meet the new goal? (more…)

5 06, 2017

New How-To Video: Portfolio Optimization

By | 2017-06-05T14:54:56+00:00 June 5th, 2017|Blog|0 Comments

In previous posts, I’ve discussed how to prioritize your portfolio of R&D investments in great detail. Today, I want to focus on prioritization’s flashy sibling, optimization.

Unlike simple prioritization schemes, optimization methods can handle multiple constraints to address competing portfolio objectives. So where a prioritization result may unduly favor later stage, less innovative projects, an optimization will suggest a more nuanced investment plan. In addition, optimization methods easily handle dependencies between lead and follow-on projects and can consider multiple development and go-to-market plans for key initiatives.

This video will take you through the whys and hows of portfolio optimization. We’re using the Enrich Analytics Platform to accomplish the optimization and scenario analysis in a way that lets us easily explore both portfolio-level implications as well as the project-by-project trade-offs suggested by each investment plan. (more…)

30 05, 2017

Pareto Charts with Enrich Analytics

By | 2017-06-05T14:39:01+00:00 May 30th, 2017|Blog|0 Comments

We’ve offered Pareto charts within both Viewport and the Enrich Analytics Platform for some time now, but haven’t had a chance to pull together a video overview until recently. Clients who build Pareto charts regularly in Excel love the option to build them, with one click, inside Enrich.

Pareto charts are very useful for understanding the distribution of cost and value across your project portfolio. With a Pareto chart you can instantly see whether a few behemoth projects dominate your portfolio, or whether you are experiencing death by a thousand cuts from dozens or hundreds of small projects. Building a portfolio in alignment with strategy requires discipline and focus, and a Pareto chart (or two) can help you see exactly where your ability to focus may be at risk.

At Enrich, we have deep experience helping companies benefit from portfolio management at every level of maturity. From startups with developing patent portfolios to the largest life science companies on the planet, we’ve deployed processes and tools that help them all make better investment decisions. If you’re interested in learning how our tools (Viewport and the Enrich Analytics Platform) can help you level-up on your portfolio management process, drop us a line.

18 05, 2017

Prioritizing Projects: Advanced Portfolio Management II (5 of 5)

By | 2017-05-23T15:41:58+00:00 May 18th, 2017|Blog|0 Comments

This is the fifth and final post in our series on doing more portfolio management with less project data. You’ll find the whole series here.

Data needed at each level of portfolio management. The only required data are the three items in the orange Beginner box. How much further you go depends on your people, your portfolio, and your goals. See the first post in this series for more information.

Prioritizing Projects: Advanced Portfolio Management II

Once you’ve collected project information and gathered some information about project value, whether through a simple scoring process or in the form of complex financial metrics, you have enough information to build a prioritization (what we call a “bang-for-the-buck curve”)—see below for an example. This analysis is helpful for prioritizing projects in terms of value for money. Our video on project prioritization has all the lurid details on prioritization methods, best practices, and pitfalls. (more…)

18 05, 2017

Driving Portfolio Value: Advanced Portfolio Management (4 of 5)

By | 2017-05-23T15:41:58+00:00 May 18th, 2017|Blog|0 Comments

This is the fourth post in our series on doing more portfolio management with less project data. You’ll find the whole series here.

Data needed at each level of portfolio management. The only required data are the three items in the orange Beginner box. How much further you go depends on your people, your portfolio, and your goals. See the first post in this series for more information.

Driving Portfolio Value: Advanced Portfolio Management

At this point, you’ve managed to collect key data about all of your projects and created some visualizations that show how those projects measure up against strategic goals and budgets. In other words, you have a good idea of what you are doing. But how do you figure out what you should be doing? That’s advanced portfolio management, and it begins with a clear picture of the value of your projects.

Not everything you work on will be of highest value, and therefore not everything you work on will be highest priority. Valuing your projects will help you prioritize projects and (perhaps more importantly) provide teams with a common understanding of the value each initiative is expected to deliver. The key word here is expected—at least initially, you don’t know if every project will live up to your expectations. For this post, we’ll put aside methods for estimating risk and focus on a few methods for calculating a best guess at likely value. There are a large number of approaches for estimating project value, so many that they represent a continuum of approaches, from simplest and broadest to most sophisticated and detailed, rather than a list. Here, I’ve highlighted a few points on that continuum. (more…)

18 05, 2017

It’s Going to Cost You: Intermediate Portfolio Management (3 of 5)

By | 2017-05-23T15:41:58+00:00 May 18th, 2017|Blog|0 Comments

This is the third post in our series on doing more portfolio management with less project data. You’ll find the whole series here.

Data needed at each level of portfolio management. The only required data are the three items in the orange Beginner box. How much further you go depends on your people, your portfolio, and your goals. See the first post in this series for more information.

It’s Going to Cost You: Intermediate Portfolio Management

Beginning portfolio management is all about finding out what you have. Cost is the next frontier; after all, portfolio management is tricky (and necessary) because you have more to do than your people, facilities, and funds allow. Determining cost is not just about collecting receipts and purchase orders; it’s a complex set of questions about what’s currently being spent and what’s likely to be spent based on the forecasted needs of projects in progress and projects the company would like to take on. At this stage, portfolio management can help answer a range of questions about cost:

  • How much are you spending on each project in the current budget cycle?
  • What is the spending forecast by budget cycle through the life of each project, up to and including launch/completion?
  • What are the skills (or specific people) needed for each project? When will they be needed and for how long?

Answering these questions requires a variety of data sets, from relatively easy-to-acquire data about current spending to complex forecasts about project needs. All of it is valuable. Even the first level—a simple estimate of current spending for each project—will help you assess the alignment of resources with strategic goals and better understand where your people, funds, and attention are focused. (more…)

18 05, 2017

Getting Started: Beginning Portfolio Management (2 of 5)

By | 2017-05-23T15:41:58+00:00 May 18th, 2017|Blog|0 Comments

This is the second post in our series on doing more portfolio management with less project data. You’ll find the whole series here.


Data needed at each level of portfolio management. The only required data are the three items in the orange Beginner box. How much further you go depends on your people, your portfolio, and your goals. See the first post in this series for more information.

Getting Started: Beginning Portfolio Management

If you’re just starting out in portfolio management, the first step is compiling a list of your company’s active projects. This foundation will get you on the right track for basic portfolio management. Simply compiling this master list will lead to portfolio-enhancing conversations with your management team as you identify projects that can be combined, deferred, or shut down altogether.

But building a master list for the first time will require persistence. Don’t send out a spreadsheet and expect a crystal-clear list of all initiatives to arrive in your inbox. Ferreting out every project is deceptively difficult. Some projects are higher profile than others; many companies have a large number of under-the-radar, skunkworks projects, and even zombie projects that have been formally canceled—sometimes more than once—yet somehow refuse to die. You might also encounter more than a few redundant projects. Getting to all this information generally requires a combination of top-down assessments (where you ask each division or department to list its ongoing initiatives) and bottom-up investigative work (where you canvass teams to find out what they are working on day to day). Taken together, the dossiers you build from these two sources will produce a complete picture of what is ongoing at your firm. (more…)

15 05, 2017

Portfolio Management for Everyone: Getting Value and Building Capability (1 of 5)

By | 2017-05-23T15:41:58+00:00 May 15th, 2017|Blog|0 Comments

It’s a familiar refrain from the project and portfolio managers we talk to: “These portfolio views are amazing, but there is no way we have the data to use Enrich Analytics.” We LOVE hearing this, because we can respond with good news: You probably have enough information to leverage our tools and gain big insights into your portfolio’s alignment with strategy, and you might even have enough to prioritize your initiatives. In fact, you can get some value from Enrich’s powerful cloud-based platforms no matter what data you have. This post is the first in a series that summarizes the data you need for basic, intermediate, and advanced portfolio management. The figure below captures the key data sets as you build maturity in using Enrich’s platform and in developing your portfolio analysis process.

Data needed at each level of portfolio management. The only requirements to get started are the three items in the orange Beginner box. How much further you go depends on your people, your portfolio, and your goals.

Everything in the orange Beginner box is essential. You can’t get your portfolio initiative off the ground without those pieces, so start there. Within the Intermediate and Advanced sections, you can pick and choose what suits your needs; the left-most options are the easiest to collect—those on the right are progressively more difficult (but also likely to pay deeper dividends). The Advanced section is divided into two groups, capturing two different kinds of value-based criteria: scores and market/financial metrics. I’ve separated them because some companies are metric-averse, preferring a scoring model, and others rely almost exclusively on metrics. The right answer for a given portfolio depends on the company’s culture, portfolio content, and strategic objectives.

We developed this series of posts as an alternative to the other “how-to-PPM” guides available on the interwebs today, which tend to suggest that all or nothing is the only way. Our goal is to make portfolio management more accessible to more companies by demystifying it—and showing just how little information is really needed to get substantial value from a simple portfolio process. This series focuses on the data required at each step because so much of the resistance we’ve seen to portfolio management involves data acquisition. We hear, over and over again, “Nobody has time to provide it and nobody believes what we’ve compiled.” We think our stepwise approach, by making the process manageable, can help a lot of companies get started. (more…)